Explorations and Reflections

on awakening the true self  in education

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  • Mick Scott

Schools: Access to Being in Love with Life.

There are gaps in how we do education. I want us to fill those gaps.


I want schools to give students reliable access to confidence, creativity, and clarity. I want our young people to be grounded, self-expressed, and prepared to explore and develop skills in areas they’re interested in. I want students graduating high school with reliable access to being in love with life.


As models of adulthood for every student, teachers need this education too. So I'm starting with us.


This year, I’m working on a project addressing this gap in our education. The project will guide teachers (and others!) to greater levels of satisfaction, enjoyment, ease, and peace of mind in their lives and their work.


I’ve seen that I am most effective in my teaching when I am in that zone, yet effective tools and techniques to consistently achieve this experiences are not part of the typical training and professional development workshops that schools have teachers participating in. In fact, these tools, techniques, and understanding are not typically in any of our traditional education!


While this project is aimed at heightening teachers’ experience of their own lives, this project is actually about our students and society itself. There’s a missed opportunity in the way we typically educate young people, and that missed opportunity has little to do with teaching technique and almost nothing to do with subject content. But it has nearly everything to do with a teacher's access to their true nature.


This blog is my twice-weekly attempt to refine my own thinking and planning and to receive helpful feedback from you, my reader. Thank you for exploring this path with me. ❤️

Thanks for joining me on this exploration/reflection! If you'd like to receive blog updates via email, be sure to subscribe here.

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